Notes on the Savopoulos Killings

NOTE: This article references Stratfor Global Intelligence and the following URL:

https://www.stratfor.com/weekly/savopoulos-case-study-protective-intelligence

Notes on the Savopoulos Killings

On May 14, 2014, the CEO of American Iron Works, Savvas Savopoulos, his wife, 10-year old son, and housekeeper were brutally murdered and their house set on fire in a failed attempt to destroy evidence. Subsequent investigation produced a viable suspect by the name of Darron Wint. Mr. Wint was a former employee of American Iron Works who worked from 2003 to 2005. Why this former employee was obsessed to the point of planning a home invasion and deliberate murder and torture of his former boss’s family has still not been fully explained, but apparently involved extorting money after kidnapping the family. It is likely that Wint had an accomplice, but no one has yet been identified or suspected.

Even more troubling was that Wint did have a previous encounter with the company run by the man whose family he slaughtered. In 2010, Wint was arrested outside the company headquarters with a machete and a BB pistol. Instead of treating this more seriously, surprisingly Wint was able to walk away with only a guilty charge of possessing an open container.

The facts of how the murder occurred makes it clear that this crime was carefully planned and orchestrated. Investigations show that the intruders gained entry and control at some time on May 13, tortured the child in order to force Savopoulos to have $40,000 in cash delivered privately and secretly to his home, only to then have all of the hostages murdered, some stabbed and some clubbed to death.

While in this case, there is no reversing history for the Savopoulos victims, the facts present a simple yet important truth. Many flags should have been raised and many alarms should have been rung. While most disgruntled employees will only grumble and complain, it only takes one extreme case to turn it into a tragic event that perhaps with better vigilance and attention could have been entirely avoided.

 

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